Countries

homepage-img2
flag

Australia

Cases of human trafficking for labour exploitation and forced labour have been found in a variety of employment sectors in Australia. Sectors such as agriculture, construction, hospitality, manufacturing, nursing and domestic work employ large numbers of migrant workers and have been frequently associated with labour trafficking in Australia. Agricultural work in particular is thought to employ considerable numbers of undocumented workers who move with the seasonal nature of the work and work on properties in remote locations...

Find out more
flag

Argentina

Instances of forced labour and human trafficking for labour exploitation have been found in Argentina, mainly in sweatshops and in agriculture, but also in a variety of other sectors including street vending, charcoal and brick production, domestic work, and in the retail sector. According to the Ministry of Justice, 8894 victims of trafficking were rescued between the adoption of the Anti-Trafficking Law in 2008 and April 2015, roughly half of whom had been subjected to trafficking for labour exploitation.

Find out more
flag

Austria

Instances of forced labour and human trafficking for labour exploitation have been found in various sectors in Austria, in particular the agriculture, construction, tourism, domestic work and the cleaning sectors are prone to exploitation. According to a 2014 situation report by the Austrian Criminal Intelligence Service, sexual and labour exploitation were the main forms of exploitation prevalent in Austria. Labour exploitation was identified mostly in forestry, agriculture, construction ...

Find out more
flag

Bangladesh

Forced labour and human trafficking for labour exploitation are believed to be extensive in Bangladesh, both within the country and across borders to India, Pakistan, the Persian Gulf, Lebanon, Maldives, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Brunei, Sudan, Mauritius, the United States, and Europe. A significant number Bangladeshis, primarily young men, are recruited for work overseas through fraudulent employment promises but are later subjected to exploitative conditions of labour through forced labour ...

Find out more
flag

Belgium

Instances of forced labour and human trafficking for the purpose of labour exploitation have been found in a wide range of economic sectors Belgium, including agriculture, clothing factories, construction, cleaning services, carwashes, the hospitality industry and retail. According to a report published by the Group of Experts on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings (GRETA), over half of the victims of trafficking identified in Belgium during 2009-2012 had been trafficked for the purpose of labour exploitation.

Find out more
flag

Brazil

Slave labour in Brazil has traditionally been linked to agricultural work, including cattle, crops and plantation farming - such as cotton, coffee, maize, rice, cocoa, soya and beans - in rural areas. Forced and slave labour are intricately related to poverty and the issue of concentrated landownership in Brazil. Forced labour is prevalent in the agricultural sector of Brazil, where men particularly are lured by deceptive promises of a good salary and working conditions, only to become entrapped in debt bondage.

Find out more
flag

India

Forced labour and human trafficking for labour exploitation are pervasive issues in India. Forced labour and debt bondage are widespread within the country: men, women, and children are held in debt bondage (sometimes inherited from previous generations) and forced to work in a variety of industries including brick kilns, carpet weaving, embroidery and textile manufacturing, mining, and agriculture. Some Bangladeshi and Nepali migrants are subjected to forced labour in India through ...

Find out more
flag

Nepal

Nepal faces systematic challenges primarily as a source country, but also a destination and transit country, for men, women and children subjected to trafficking for labour exploitation and forced labour. Nepal has made significant socio-economic progress in the past decade, reducing its absolute poverty rate from 42% to 23.8%. However, the absence of decent domestic employment opportunities continues to drive Nepali men and women to migrate for work abroad. A significant number of Nepali overseas workers have been ...

Find out more
flag

Nigeria

Nigeria occupies a central position in West Africa as a country of origin, transit and destination for victims of human trafficking for labour exploitation and forced labour. Men, women and children from Nigeria are trafficked to Western Europe, the Middle East, and West and Central African countries. Victims from neighbouring countries of Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Mali and Niger are also exploited in Nigeria in a wide range of industries, including domestic work, mining, stone quarrying...

Find out more
flag

Philippines

The Philippines faces significant challenges as a source country and, to a lesser extent, a destination and transit country for men, women, and children subjected to trafficking for labour exploitation and forced labor. According to the International Labour Organization (ILO), one million Filipino men and women leave the country every year to work overseas, and a total of 10 million Filipinos live and work abroad. A significant number of these Filipino overseas workers have been found to have been trafficked and subjected to ...

Find out more
flag

Qatar

Labour exploitation in the Qatari context is inextricably linked to migrant work, mainly due to the fact that there are an estimated 1.2 million migrant workers in Qatar, who make up 94% of the country’s workforce and 88% of the total population. The majority of these workers have migrated to Qatar from South and South-East Asia, including Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka to work as low- and semi-skilled workers, primarily in construction, services and domestic ...

Find out more
flag

Spain

Forced labour and human trafficking for the purpose of labour exploitation exist in a wide range of industries in Spain, including in the construction, agriculture, hotel and food service, domestic work and eldercare, industrial and textile sectors. The Spanish authorities reported identifying 169 trafficking victims in 2015, out of which 104 were victims of labour trafficking. The majority of the trafficking victims identified in Spain have been foreign nationals, including men, women and children from Eastern Europe (particularly Romania ...

Find out more
flag

Thailand

Human trafficking, forced labour and slavery are a significant and on-going issue in Thailand, which is both a source and destination country for exploited migrant labour. Severe labour abuses have been reported in the Thai fishing, seafood and fruit processing factories, and in the garment sector, among others. Thai nationals have also been trafficked from Thailand on large scales to work in exploitative conditions in other countries, including the United States and Israel. The vulnerability ...

Find out more
flag

United Kingdom

Instances of forced labour and human trafficking for the purpose of labour exploitation have been found in a wide range of economic sectors in the UK, including agriculture, food processing, construction, block paving, fishing, manufacturing, car washes, and domestic work. According to the National Crime Agency, 2,340 potential victims of human trafficking were encountered by the National Referral Mechanism in the UK in 2014, one third of whom had been referred as potential victims of labour ...

Find out more
flag

United States

Forced labour and human trafficking for the purpose of labour exploitation exists in a wide range of industries in the United States (US), including hospitality, agriculture, manufacturing, cleaning, construction, shipyards, restaurants, health and care, beauty salons, and domestic service. Victims are often from vulnerable populations, such as migrant labourers, employees in ethnic business, rural workers, homeless youth and adults, and domestic workers. Visa regimes and exploitative recruitment practices for ...

Find out more