Regulation 8-12

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Child labour Maximum working hours, overtime, weekly rest and leave

Regulation 11 provides that adult workers are entitled to a daily rest period of 11 hours per day, and young workers are entitled to 12 hours of rest per day.

Notes

A young worker is a worker aged under 18.

Where the pattern according to which an employer organizes work is such as to put the health and safety of a worker employed by him at risk, in particular because the work is monotonous or the work-rate is predetermined, the employer shall ensure that the worker is given adequate rest breaks.

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Regulation 10(1): 

An adult worker is entitled to a rest period of not less than eleven consecutive hours in each 24-hour period.

Workers aged under 18 (“young workers”) are entitled to a rest period of at least 12 consecutive hours in each 24-hour period.

Regulation 11:

An adult worker is entitled to either:

(i) an uninterrupted rest period of not less than 24 hours in each seven-day period;

(ii) an uninterrupted rest period of not less than 48 hours in each 14-day period; or

(iii) two uninterrupted rest periods of not less than 24 hours in each 14-day period.

A young worker is entitled, with limited exceptions, to a rest period of not less than 48 hours in each seven-day period during which he works for his employer.

Regulation 12:

If an adult worker’s daily working time is more than 6 hours, he is entitled to a rest break.

If a worker aged under 18 (“young worker”) has daily working time of more than 4.5 hours, he is entitled to a rest break of at least 30 minutes.

Law / United Kingdom / Working Time Regulations 1998

The Working Time Regulations set the maximum working hours per week, for regular and night-workers.  The Regulations include an “opt-out” through written agreement, as well as exclusions for certain sectors.

The Regulations implement the EU Working Time Directive 2008/88/EC.  The European Commission is currently reviewing this Directive, due to the frequent usage of the “opt-out” provision, particularly by large organisations.